About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
copy will not be festooned with all these post-it notes. as well as the politics and foreign policy editor at slate. he goes to the foreign newsmagazine and when he was the managing editor of foreign policy magazine counted twice won the award for general excellence, which i can tell you with a good feat in itself and particularly impressive given that foreign policy is a relatively small circulation journal, not a deep-pocketed magazines like "vanity fair" or "esquire." both articles and essays have appeared in "the new york times," "washington post" and "wall street journal" and his provide analysis for abc, cnn, msnbc and npr. he's in washington d.c. her very happy to have them with us here today. [applause] the dictators learning curve is a look at an arms race, speaking metaphorically that dictators and democratic activist trying to overthrow and both sides have had to up their game in recent years. for those of you who think foreign policy is about trade agreements, arms treaties come arcing border disputes, let me assure you it's a lively read a stun dobson's travels across t
the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwealth club agents all of whom are as interested as you are in savitt discussion and social interaction. now want to this evening's program, there are question cards you should have been handed on your seats for joan walsh. fill them out, right on the question and there will be collected and we will ask them in the program. there's also a microphone in the audience, were there will be in a while and we will take some oral questions toward the end of the program so i will remind you when the time comes you can line up with a microphone and ask your questions. we appreciate you keeping questions short and please make sure they are questions and not statements. copies of the new book, what's the latter with white people, on sale in the lobby. she will be pleased to sign them outside the room immediately following the program. i
on the cold war, including mining, classicking thes of american foreign policy in the post war era inspired me to do the same with the war. it was no easy task. books on the war built library shelfs, and you can go in and see. how could they say anything new about an event studied thoroughly? what i discovered was we knew very little what was happening in hanoi in the enemy's capitol. while historians wrote countless studies on american leaders, vietnamese counterparts, especially those in the north, received shockingly little attention. how do we know so much about the american side and so little about the vietnamese? it just so happens i entered graduate school when arian kyes from the former and present communist world opened doors. i attempted what previous historians could not, to tell the story in hanoi's eyes. i wanted to answer questions that eluded previous score lars. why was the struggle an international conflict, and how did they manage to defeat the strongest superpower the world had ever seen? talk about being in the right place at the right time. although it was difficult for ov
obama is, you know, he's the obviously the first and only black president he's policy an outsider in other really significant ways. he has a unusual name. he was largely grew up in foreign country. he, you know, he worked adds a community organizer with very poor people in a housing project until the south side of chicago. these are things that are extremely suspicious to lots of people in our country. and instead of talking about it doctor directly they use the other terms to code him to describe him as outer calling him a socialist. calling him a communist. these things that manifestly have nothing do with who he is. interest thing about barack obama, if you read his awe disty of hope, his memoir, if you look at the great speech the greatest moment it's about conciliation. this is what how he sees himself. this is an he did want to be a great president. he wanted to bid for greatness and by getting a grand bar iman. doing something bipartisan. he is born conciliators. that's who he is. the sad thing at the end of the day, the tragedy of barack obama is that he was a man who was
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4